Author Topic: "Piper's" Restoration Progress  (Read 17419 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline NWW-79 T/A

  • Adv. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1882
  • 16 Year Old T/A Owner
  • Referrals: 2
Re: "Piper's" Restoration Progress
« Reply #60 on: May 07, 2013, 12:32:58 AM »
Looks great man

Thanks little buddy, bit by bit she is coming along............yet I have so far to go.  Heck, I want to drive it!!  Soon, the motor will be next.
I know how you feel. I want to drive mine too. Not quite ready yet though. How is the engine? Could the 403 be saved? I remember it had some damage
Romney/Ryan 2012

-1979 Solar Gold Trans Am in Restoration-

Offline TurdPolisher

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 160
  • Bucket List # 3 under way
  • Referrals: 0
Re: "Piper's" Restoration Progress
« Reply #61 on: May 07, 2013, 06:49:53 PM »
Looks great man

Thanks little buddy, bit by bit she is coming along............yet I have so far to go.  Heck, I want to drive it!!  Soon, the motor will be next.
I know how you feel. I want to drive mine too. Not quite ready yet though. How is the engine? Could the 403 be saved? I remember it had some damage

Well when it is done, you will just appreciate even more.  The 403 could be saved, but with an offer for a running 400 for $200 I couldn't pass it up.  I will be porting and rebuilding the heads, slapping some headers in there and tossing in a new cam.  In a few months it might be running, not sure yet pending funds as I'm taking a vacation...........as life isn't one already.
If you are going to do it wrong........you might as well do it RIGHT!

Offline pancho400cid

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 669
  • Viva los PONCHOS!!
  • Referrals: 0
Re: "Piper's" Restoration Progress
« Reply #62 on: May 07, 2013, 07:29:06 PM »
Looking good!

I'm close to where you were in March.  I have my brown car largely taken apart and debating how to tackle the under-side.

Hauling the car to a blaster will be a bitch.  Laying on my back with a grinder and cup brush... well.... that will be a bitch too.

My car looks very much like yours did before you cleaned it up beneath, and if it really took a hundred hours, that is a lot of elapsed time for me at the 10-hours-a-week-if-I'm-lucky rate I can do.  Gotta pull the trigger one way or the other soon.

Anyway - Keep it up! 
1978 Trans Am - Brown - Current Project
1978 Trans Am - Silver - Future Uncertain

Offline TurdPolisher

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 160
  • Bucket List # 3 under way
  • Referrals: 0
Re: "Piper's" Restoration Progress
« Reply #63 on: June 09, 2013, 08:46:04 PM »
Hey there fellow TA restoration wild men.  >:D It's been a while since I have posted as I have been busy with getting the backyard landscaped among other things.  I have been busy on Piper though here an there but nothing big enough to post. 

Well, the wheels are restored and looking sharp. After checking the build sheet, I noticed that the original wheels were silver. So after getting them all buffed out, painted, clear coated and shop tires mounted, they came out OK.  Each wheel took me about 10 hours each.  I still have to fix come curb damage on a couple, but for now they will work.  I am just tired of working on them for now.

Well, the first set of Evercoat Superbuild 4:1 has been sanded and I am ready to mount the doors, core support, and fenders, to establish good body lines, but first, the sub frame had to be installed.  I used aluminum bushings and a bolt to get everything lined up and square. 

So happy to finally get the subframe attached.




Now it's on to fixing the core support and install with new bushings and bolts......followed by the fenders and a final 2 coats of Superbuild 4:1.  Moving right along!!   ;D
« Last Edit: June 09, 2013, 09:01:41 PM by TurdPolisher »
If you are going to do it wrong........you might as well do it RIGHT!

Offline TurdPolisher

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 160
  • Bucket List # 3 under way
  • Referrals: 0
Re: "Piper's" Restoration Progress
« Reply #64 on: June 09, 2013, 09:14:40 PM »
Looking good!

I'm close to where you were in March.  I have my brown car largely taken apart and debating how to tackle the under-side.

Hauling the car to a blaster will be a bitch.  Laying on my back with a grinder and cup brush... well.... that will be a bitch too.

My car looks very much like yours did before you cleaned it up beneath, and if it really took a hundred hours, that is a lot of elapsed time for me at the 10-hours-a-week-if-I'm-lucky rate I can do.  Gotta pull the trigger one way or the other soon.

Anyway - Keep it up!
Thanks!!  You can do it man.......PULL THAT TRIGGER!! Remember, this is your hobby, and a hobby knows no time limit.  ;D well, if your ride was anywhere near mine was when you started, then hats off to ya........I know it takes a lot of time but well worth the reward of doing it all your self.  Not to sound vain, but I enjoy taking a step back and saying.  "I did that}}}"  WOW

Well, the undercarriage did take a whole lot of time. I had the entire undercarriage taken apart and such for a complete resto as you know.  It was winter and you have no idea how bad I wanted to take that thing sledding.  ;D

Now mind you, I have never done this stuff before so, yes the time is because of trial and error in part.  If you plan to restore all of the rear leaf perch bushings and shocks, it will be way easier if you just take the tank out and the whole shabang. Yes having it blasted would have been nice, but trust me when it is all done with your hands....you will be much more happy with knowing you saved the money and did it yourself.............look at it as a labor of love.......and with a beer in hand with the music up LOUD.... >:D........time is nothing and you will have a whole lot or money left in your pocket.  Git er done!!  Can't wait to see the pics.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2013, 09:21:55 PM by TurdPolisher »
If you are going to do it wrong........you might as well do it RIGHT!

Offline TurdPolisher

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 160
  • Bucket List # 3 under way
  • Referrals: 0
Re: "Piper's" Restoration Progress
« Reply #65 on: June 29, 2013, 07:33:32 PM »
Well, I finally got around to digging into the engine.  So I learned a valuable, very  basic lesson.  Jumper cables on a test stand to NOT substitute for a good connection as that damn thing just would not crank hard enough to get a compression test.  Daaa

Anyway, the numbers are as follows:

Dry Comp test
#1 - 160
#2 - 150
#3 - 160
#4 - 150
#5 - 120
#6 - 120
#7 - 60
#8 - 100

Well, the 5, 6, 7, and 8 don't look good. Some of them were bleeding air, but that might be fixed with the valve lapping. The number 7 spooked me so I did a wet test on the #7 to see if it would come up showing excessive ring wear and it stayed the same.  After some thought, I thought it must have been a burnt valve or poor seating.  I tore into the head and pulled the valves on the #7 to start.  Sure enough the valve seal O rings were  dry and broken and the exhaust valve was caked so much with carbon, I doubt is was flowing much air.  The valve seat was pretty caked to on the edge and on the valve seat of the head.  The problem might also be a crack somewhere, but I won't know till I take them down and get them dipped and magnafluxed.  My fingers are crossed!  But, based on the carbon build up and the broken seal, and the carbon on the valve seats, I think when I get the valves cleaned up and lapped I think they will have a better seal.  Now on to the other head and I will CC them to find out how much will need to be taken off to achieve the proper balance of SCR for the Comp Cam XE262H.  I would like have nailed down the recommended Crower 60916, but it likes a higher compression that I don't think will work with my 6X8 heads.  I don't want to mill off too much to achieve the recommended 9:1 comp ratio.  Maybe domed pistons along with milled heads would do that.  Geno helped out in the past with the thoughts on the cam selection. I will check with him.

Yes, I think I need to rebuild the entire engine based on the few low comp. readings.  There goes my goal of keeping it in a budget.  But, it will be completely done right.........but a little longer to get it drivable as I only have a budget of $150 a month. But hey, it is cheaper then a car payment and I don't like credit cards! Being totally debt free as worth it!!

Anyway, I'm going to start with the heads first.  I'll put the comp springs on them if they don't come back cracked, bag them up and move on to the long block.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2013, 07:39:38 PM by TurdPolisher »
If you are going to do it wrong........you might as well do it RIGHT!

Offline Grand73Am

  • Adv. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2782
  • Referrals: 0
Re: "Piper's" Restoration Progress
« Reply #66 on: July 06, 2013, 10:49:54 PM »
Good to read about your progress, but sorry about your engine.

It's a coincidence about your compression check, since last week I picked up a used 403 Olds engine to replace a knocking 403 in one of my 79's. Can't afford to rebuild the original engine now, so I wanted to just find a good running replacement that didn't knock or smoke.  Found one locally on Craig's list. The seller let me leave a small refundable deposit, and take the engine home and check it out before having to pay for it, so I was only risking my time.  I just checked compression on it today, and luckily for me, they were all from 150 to 160, and it doesn't knock or smoke. So, I'm keeping the engine and paid the man :-) .
Steve F.

Offline TurdPolisher

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 160
  • Bucket List # 3 under way
  • Referrals: 0
Re: "Piper's" Restoration Progress
« Reply #67 on: July 15, 2013, 03:24:54 AM »
Good to read about your progress, but sorry about your engine.

It's a coincidence about your compression check, since last week I picked up a used 403 Olds engine to replace a knocking 403 in one of my 79's. Can't afford to rebuild the original engine now, so I wanted to just find a good running replacement that didn't knock or smoke.  Found one locally on Craig's list. The seller let me leave a small refundable deposit, and take the engine home and check it out before having to pay for it, so I was only risking my time.  I just checked compression on it today, and luckily for me, they were all from 150 to 160, and it doesn't knock or smoke. So, I'm keeping the engine and paid the man :-) .

What a score man..........good deal!  As for me, well, I do have low numbers in a few and with the 60psi in the no 7....it was time for a break down. In inspecting the valves, I noted many of them were pitted, two fairly bad on the valve shaft and with the carbon build up on them, the low compression ratios might be in part to poor sealing at the valve seat.  I just might mount up the heads after rebuild and do another comp test to see how things have changed.
Glad to hear you got a got motor man!
« Last Edit: July 15, 2013, 03:32:13 AM by TurdPolisher »
If you are going to do it wrong........you might as well do it RIGHT!

Offline Grand73Am

  • Adv. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2782
  • Referrals: 0
Re: "Piper's" Restoration Progress
« Reply #68 on: July 15, 2013, 09:58:11 AM »
Good idea. It would be interesting to see what difference your valve job makes.
Steve F.

Offline TurdPolisher

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 160
  • Bucket List # 3 under way
  • Referrals: 0
Re: "Piper's" Restoration Progress
« Reply #69 on: July 05, 2014, 05:32:19 PM »
Hey all.....the TurdPolisher is back and beer 30 in Redmond OR and work is in progress again.  Been a while since I posted as life took me for a spin and had to get back on my feet.  s#^* HAPPENS RIGHT?
ANYHOW, I sourced the 3.08 rear end to replace the 2.42 out of my 80 pace car parts car and also the quarter panel section. I spend hours trying to get the body line just right with no luck.   I was spooked to cut into the cars as I have never welded before....and I read sheet metal is challenging to mig weld.  I just had to get out there and practice then get er done.

I didn't want to do a butt weld but had to improvise one as the gap was too large. I simply spot strips under the good car panel so it stuck out about a half inch for a shelf for the quarter panel section to lay on top of.  Then i stitch welded the panel in place jumping around the panel.
i was very happy with how it went. For my first big job.  No warping and body lines are perfect.
just a bit more body work and she will be ready for the seal coat, then on to the interior..  one small step at a time

Tomorrow I will pull the dash, to get it ready for restoration in the winter.  Then Ill epoxy this bad bad boy and dynafiber the weld followeed by Evercoat Rage. 
Hope everyones projects are going well.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2014, 03:33:41 AM by TurdPolisher »
If you are going to do it wrong........you might as well do it RIGHT!

Offline TurdPolisher

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 160
  • Bucket List # 3 under way
  • Referrals: 0
Re: "Piper's" Restoration Progress
« Reply #70 on: March 17, 2016, 05:32:05 PM »
Hey everyone........I'm back at it again. Ok, this whole thing called life can really be a drag.  Anyway, it has been over 2 years since my last post as a job change took place which had me on the road a great deal.  Finally, they put me back to home base and now I have a little more time. My how time flies!!
Recap.... The 403 was junk so that is probably a boat anchor by now.  I have one 400 that needs rebuilding and I bought a 77 rusted out parts car with a strong running (rebuilt 6000 miles ago) 400 and TH350 transmission and other needed parts for a complete car for $1800.  The 77 nose is in great condition as is the rear tail lights. Although I like that style nose, I'm keeping the 79 stock due to the rare Oyster/Carmine red interior package.  I am so very tempted to paint it silver with tinted windows and slap some 17 inch Foose wheels on it though.

I may put the 77 nose and tail lights up for sale to pay for my paint.  With all of the Smokey cars out there, it will sell fast I"m sure.  Mayan red is kind of  spendy for the good stuff.

For now, I'm just doing a little rust repair of the floor panels. Wire brush, brush some Rust Bullet to treat the rust and some fiberglass on the holes with a skim coat of JB weld in the pitted area should build it up and make it solid while treating the rust.  If you haven't looked into Rust Bullet I suggest you read about it.  Anything MilSpec tested and used on rusty bridges and naval ships is good enough for me.  POR15 doesn't come close to what this stuff will do and it is the same price.

If you are going to do it wrong........you might as well do it RIGHT!