Author Topic: How I fixed my clock.  (Read 11790 times)

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Offline Gold78Spc

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How I fixed my clock.
« on: May 23, 2007, 09:04:55 PM »
I decided to attempt to fix my clock and actually did it so I decided to post what I did here and maybe I can save some of you the money that it costs to send yours out to have it done.  Its actually more work getting the clock out and putting it back in than getting it going.

The clock is actually about 95% mechanical and 5% electric and believe it or not the problem is most likely in the electric.

1. Remove your  under column trim piece and your dash bezel.

2. Hold the knob that you set the time with with one hand and using a very small screwdriver remove the screw from the knob and remove the knob.



3. Remove the screws holding in the speedo guage cluster, pull the cluster out and disconnect the tach wires, speedo wires, and speedo cable etc and gently remove the guage cluster.

4. Remove the plastic face from the cluster and the black trim piece.

5. Remove the Lights from the backside of the cluster.  I only took the stuff off of the tach side of the cluster but if you didn't want to chance damaging your printed circuit you could remove all of the lights and screws and take the circuit out.



6. Remove the screws and 2 nuts circled in purple.  Then the yellow ones.  The 3 circled in yellow are the 3 main ones holding in the tach.



7. Gently lift up on the printed circuit and pull the tach patially out.  It will not come out from the backside, you just need to lift it out far enough to disconnect the red and black wires for the clock.



8. After wires are disconnected gently lower tach back into cluster, turn cluster over and remove the tach from the front.

9. When the tach is out turn it over and remove the 2 screws holding in the clock.



10. Once the clock is out gently remove the second hand by pulling straight out.  I recommend using your fingernails if you can.  The paint on the face of the second hand is very delicate.  I pulled a little of the paint off using needlenose pliers and ended up having to repaint the face when I put it back together.  Once the second hand is off you can use needlenoses to pull off the minute then hour hand by pulling straight back.  Once the needles are off use a small screw driver to slightly bend out the 3 tabs holding the clock face on.  Only bend them just enough to remove the clock face.



11.  Once the clock face is off turn the unit over and again gently bend out the 3 tabs enough to seperate the clock housing.



12.  Once the unit is apart you can do quite a few things.  First drop a little 3 n 1 oil on the gears. Then you can test to see if the clock functions mechanically.  Do this by using your finger to move the contact indicated by the right arrow all the way to the right.  This will load the spring and if the unit is mechanically ok your clock will start to work !!.  If your clock is mechanically ok take a little fine grit sandpaper or something similar to clean the contacts up ( indicated by the two yellow arrows).  This is all you really need to do.  You can test the unit by hooking it up to your battery using jumper wires ( Black wire to the body, red to positive cable).  Once the unit has power to it what will happen is when the spring tension pulls the 2 contacts together and electrical charge will throw the right contact all the way to the right and the spring takes over again.



13.  Reassembly is basically everything you did in reverse.  When you put the housing back together, and reinstall the face make sure you use needle noses or a screwdriver to pinch the tabs back closed tightly.

14. When you reinstall the hands set the time to 12:00 exactly. Just makes sure your hands will point to the right time when you put it all back together. 

And thats about it.  If I think of any steps I missed or other helpful tips I will make sure I add them.  If anyone has any questions just PM me.  I usually check the forum at least once a day. every other at the most.
78 Gold Special Edition TA
96 GMC Sierra
99 Diamondback 18 Spd
00 Ford Windstar
04 Buick Rendezvous
05 Roadmaster tricycle


Keep on Moppin' in the Free world.

Offline Gold78Spc

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Re: How I fixed my clock.
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2007, 09:16:46 PM »
Well thats par for the course for this type of clock but so far its only lost about 1 minute in 9 hours.  So if thats the case I can adjust the time every now and then.
78 Gold Special Edition TA
96 GMC Sierra
99 Diamondback 18 Spd
00 Ford Windstar
04 Buick Rendezvous
05 Roadmaster tricycle


Keep on Moppin' in the Free world.

Offline Gold78Spc

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Re: How I fixed my clock.
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2007, 09:28:13 PM »
I actually just tested it 4 times against a digital stopwatch.  It was .22, .50, .12, and .28 seconds behind for a 1 minute test.  Some of that error could be when I hit the button, so over all I think its pretty darn close and as good as you can expect from this clock.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2007, 09:33:04 PM by Gold78Spc »
78 Gold Special Edition TA
96 GMC Sierra
99 Diamondback 18 Spd
00 Ford Windstar
04 Buick Rendezvous
05 Roadmaster tricycle


Keep on Moppin' in the Free world.

Offline Hitman

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Re: How I fixed my clock.
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2007, 10:08:05 PM »
Nice tip to have.  Thanks for posting it.
Brett Campbell
"Hitman"
www.78ta.com
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1978 Trans Am

Offline wheels78ta

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Re: How I fixed my clock.
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2007, 10:11:52 PM »
Excellent How-To on the clock, Brian...a lot of effort just to get it on here....but why do these clocks not keep good time?  Is there anything that can be done to help it keep better time?    :P
1978 Y88  W72 WS6 4-SPD 79,000 miles
1987 Chevy K5 Blazer 7.4L Vortec 4x4
2005 Chevy Suburban 2500 8.1L Vortec 4x4
2006 Chevy Silverado Z71 5.3L Vortec 4x4

Offline ta78w72

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Re: How I fixed my clock.
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2007, 10:52:51 PM »
Read the service manual.  There's a disclaimer about how hard it is to make a clock accurate.  Kind of funny.

"The electric clock, available on all series, operates on direct current from the car battery and must not be compared too closely for accruacy to a home electric clock operating on alternating current.  The cycles per second of alternating current used in the home are controlled and periodically correct at the power house, thereby elimating accumulation of errors.  With the direct current system, no such control is possible; therfore, automobile electirc clocks will accumulate errors day by day the same as handwound, spring-operated clocks."

The most common problem with these clocks is not electrical, it's that the clock needs oiling.  The second most common problem, which can be fatal, is pitting of the contacts.  Sometimes you can file them, but most of the time it's curtains.

Offline eroc022

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Re: How I fixed my clock.
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2007, 11:43:52 AM »
thats a good writeup.....but you could always just buy another car with a working clock right ?
Eroc
Fixing the car that Restore A Muscle Car jacked up....

Offline Gold78Spc

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Re: How I fixed my clock.
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2007, 01:17:59 PM »
It might be easier !!
78 Gold Special Edition TA
96 GMC Sierra
99 Diamondback 18 Spd
00 Ford Windstar
04 Buick Rendezvous
05 Roadmaster tricycle


Keep on Moppin' in the Free world.

Offline rkellerjr

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Re: How I fixed my clock.
« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2007, 01:41:05 PM »
Brian, that is an awesome write up guy!  Thanks for posting.
Rich

Offline Teglhus

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Re: How I fixed my clock.
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2007, 05:51:42 PM »
My clock in the TA will only run for 10-20 sec. then it will stop. That can only be oil job, and the thing should run again right? :)
Teglhus, Denmark
1978 SE "Bandit" Trans Am

Offline 784mula

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Re: How I fixed my clock.
« Reply #10 on: July 06, 2007, 10:45:36 PM »
My clock is also spuratic where it will run for several minutes, then stop or when it feels like it. I may try this procedure when I get some time. Thanks for the post.

1978 FORMULA 1st place 2007 TA NATS Stk Class
1977 FORMULA (Gone but not forgotten)

Offline 77 se ta

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Re: How I fixed my clock.
« Reply #11 on: July 06, 2007, 11:19:05 PM »
On mine, once I start the car I pull out the adjusting knob and release it, then the clock will run accurately as long as the car is running... shut off the car, the clock stops running within a couple minutes

So I get in the car, start it, set the time, release the knob and I'm good... weird I know, but that's how mine works
1977 SE T/A
1974 T/A
1999 Mustang GT ragtop
2007 Ford F150 King Ranch
2000 Land Rover Disco I

Offline willie g

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Re: How I fixed my clock.
« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2007, 07:38:58 AM »
The clock in my 80 ta (in my avatar) keeps perfect time but the tach doesn't work.Can't have it all can we? ;)

Offline Keith

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Re: How I fixed my clock.
« Reply #13 on: December 16, 2007, 12:46:18 AM »
Wow, what can I say. That was awesome.

Thanks!

I decided to attempt to fix my clock and actually did it so I decided to post what I did here and maybe I can save some of you the money that it costs to send yours out to have it done.  Its actually more work getting the clock out and putting it back in than getting it going.

The clock is actually about 95% mechanical and 5% electric and believe it or not the problem is most likely in the electric.

1. Remove your  under column trim piece and your dash bezel.

2. Hold the knob that you set the time with with one hand and using a very small screwdriver remove the screw from the knob and remove the knob.



3. Remove the screws holding in the speedo guage cluster, pull the cluster out and disconnect the tach wires, speedo wires, and speedo cable etc and gently remove the guage cluster.

4. Remove the plastic face from the cluster and the black trim piece.

5. Remove the Lights from the backside of the cluster.  I only took the stuff off of the tach side of the cluster but if you didn't want to chance damaging your printed circuit you could remove all of the lights and screws and take the circuit out.



6. Remove the screws and 2 nuts circled in purple.  Then the yellow ones.  The 3 circled in yellow are the 3 main ones holding in the tach.



7. Gently lift up on the printed circuit and pull the tach patially out.  It will not come out from the backside, you just need to lift it out far enough to disconnect the red and black wires for the clock.



8. After wires are disconnected gently lower tach back into cluster, turn cluster over and remove the tach from the front.

9. When the tach is out turn it over and remove the 2 screws holding in the clock.



10. Once the clock is out gently remove the second hand by pulling straight out.  I recommend using your fingernails if you can.  The paint on the face of the second hand is very delicate.  I pulled a little of the paint off using needlenose pliers and ended up having to repaint the face when I put it back together.  Once the second hand is off you can use needlenoses to pull off the minute then hour hand by pulling straight back.  Once the needles are off use a small screw driver to slightly bend out the 3 tabs holding the clock face on.  Only bend them just enough to remove the clock face.



11.  Once the clock face is off turn the unit over and again gently bend out the 3 tabs enough to seperate the clock housing.



12.  Once the unit is apart you can do quite a few things.  First drop a little 3 n 1 oil on the gears. Then you can test to see if the clock functions mechanically.  Do this by using your finger to move the contact indicated by the right arrow all the way to the right.  This will load the spring and if the unit is mechanically ok your clock will start to work !!.  If your clock is mechanically ok take a little fine grit sandpaper or something similar to clean the contacts up ( indicated by the two yellow arrows).  This is all you really need to do.  You can test the unit by hooking it up to your battery using jumper wires ( Black wire to the body, red to positive cable).  Once the unit has power to it what will happen is when the spring tension pulls the 2 contacts together and electrical charge will throw the right contact all the way to the right and the spring takes over again.



13.  Reassembly is basically everything you did in reverse.  When you put the housing back together, and reinstall the face make sure you use needle noses or a screwdriver to pinch the tabs back closed tightly.

14. When you reinstall the hands set the time to 12:00 exactly. Just makes sure your hands will point to the right time when you put it all back together. 

And thats about it.  If I think of any steps I missed or other helpful tips I will make sure I add them.  If anyone has any questions just PM me.  I usually check the forum at least once a day. every other at the most.

Keith
78 Trans Am
Kansas City

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Re: How I fixed my clock.
« Reply #14 on: December 16, 2007, 01:24:45 AM »
Great write up man!  Makes me wish I had a 2nd gen to try this with!  LOL